Meetings

How To Take Effective Minutes

Meeting minutes are notes taken during a meeting. These notes include all pertinent information that was relayed during the meeting, as well as identifying characteristics of the meeting, and may later be used as a reference. If you are responsible for taking meeting minutes, then it is important that you know what to record in order to provide a clear and accurate account of the meeting. 

 

Step 1: Prepare for the meeting. 

Before the scheduled meeting is to take place, you will need to gather some information and align yourself with the appropriate tools.

  • Gather a list of everyone who will be attending the meeting, including the meeting leader or host.
  • Get as much information as possible from the meeting leader about the purpose and scope of the meeting. The meeting leader should be able to provide you with a basic agenda.
  • Develop a template. It should include a header with the meeting date, time, place, purpose, attendees and leader/host. The body should include designations for each topic that will be covered in the meeting. Be sure to leave space for the details of how each topic was discussed and resolved.
  • Choose a method for taking meeting minutes. You may opt to write minutes out by hand, type them using a laptop or record them with an audio recording device.

 

Step 2: Keep a seating chart

 When you take meeting minutes, you will at times need to refer to the attendee who presented an item, responded to an item or as part of the resolution of an item. Ask the name of each attendee who enters the meeting and marks that attendee's place on a seating chart so that you can use the chart when you need to reference a name.

 

Step 3: Record important information during the meeting

 Do not attempt to illustrate conversations word for word, it will take you too long. Instead, outline the key meeting points, provide short and concise details of how each point was addressed and list any actions that are called for by the resolutions. Be sure to include details of responsibility assignations. If a person agrees to do something for the next meeting please write this as an ACTION, and make sure to check the job is completed.

 

Step 4: Ask for clarification

While taking meeting minutes, you may find that certain points of discussion are unclear. If that is the case, you should interrupt the meeting in order to ask for clarification. Remember that you are responsible for recording the meeting thoroughly and accurately and that an interruption is preferable over inaccurate notes.

 

Step 5: Proof the meeting minutes

When the meeting is finished, add any notes that you feel are necessary, then have the President read over the recorded minutes to verify that they are complete and accurate. It may be worthwhile to get all members of the committee to check over the notes.

 

Step 6: Distribute and update people

Once typed up, it is important these minutes are emailed out to all involved parties and put in a public place for members to see such as FB groups, webpage news articles etc. members just need to know the general ins and outs of what happened in the meeting and what was agreed. This is a great way to be transparent and show your members you are working on things and being active as a committee.

 

 

Meeting minutes are notes taken during a meeting. These notes include all pertinent information that was relayed during the meeting, as well as identifying characteristics of the meeting, and may later be used as a reference. If you are responsible for taking meeting minutes, then it is important that you know what to record in order to provide a clear and accurate account of the meeting. 

 

Step 1: Prepare for the meeting. 

Before the scheduled meeting is to take place, you will need to gather some information and align yourself with the appropriate tools.

  • Gather a list of everyone who will be attending the meeting, including the meeting leader or host.
  • Get as much information as possible from the meeting leader about the purpose and scope of the meeting. The meeting leader should be able to provide you with a basic agenda.
  • Develop a template. It should include a header with the meeting date, time, place, purpose, attendees and leader/host. The body should include designations for each topic that will be covered in the meeting. Be sure to leave space for the details of how each topic was discussed and resolved.
  • Choose a method for taking meeting minutes. You may opt to write minutes out by hand, type them using a laptop or record them with an audio recording device.

 

Step 2: Keep a seating chart

 When you take meeting minutes, you will at times need to refer to the attendee who presented an item, responded to an item or as part of the resolution of an item. Ask the name of each attendee who enters the meeting and marks that attendee's place on a seating chart so that you can use the chart when you need to reference a name.

 

Step 3: Record important information during the meeting

 Do not attempt to illustrate conversations word for word, it will take you too long. Instead, outline the key meeting points, provide short and concise details of how each point was addressed and list any actions that are called for by the resolutions. Be sure to include details of responsibility assignations. If a person agrees to do something for the next meeting please write this as an ACTION, and make sure to check the job is completed.

 

Step 4: Ask for clarification

While taking meeting minutes, you may find that certain points of discussion are unclear. If that is the case, you should interrupt the meeting in order to ask for clarification. Remember that you are responsible for recording the meeting thoroughly and accurately and that an interruption is preferable over inaccurate notes.

 

Step 5: Proof the meeting minutes

When the meeting is finished, add any notes that you feel are necessary, then have the President read over the recorded minutes to verify that they are complete and accurate. It may be worthwhile to get all members of the committee to check over the notes.

 

Step 6: Distribute and update people

Once typed up, it is important these minutes are emailed out to all involved parties and put in a public place for members to see such as FB groups, webpage news articles etc. members just need to know the general ins and outs of what happened in the meeting and what was agreed. This is a great way to be transparent and show your members you are working on things and being active as a committee.